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20131202
20131210
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LINKTV 10
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10
LINKTV
Dec 6, 2013 5:00am PST
may have to continue to rely on nuclear energies that a cheap option to keep the economic engine running. ron madison is here with more. >> japanese government officials drafted a basic energy policy. it says the country will maintain nuclear power generation as an important base source of electricity. the draft has been presented to the industry ministries a's energy policy panel. it says japan needs to reduce its reliance on nuclear energy as much as possible but that does go on to say the country will continue nuclear power generation as long as the safety of power plants is ensured. it notes that nuclear power allows the steady supply of electricity at a lower cost and without aggravating climate change. the draft represents a major shift from a policy drawn up last year by the government of the democratic policy, the policy aimed at ending nuclear power generation in the 2030s t came after the 2011 nuclear accident at the fukushima daiichi plant. all nuclear reactor plants in japan are currently offline. the new policy contains no mention of a plan to rebuild a nuclear power
LINKTV
Dec 2, 2013 2:00pm PST
tools such as satellites. the impending exhaustion of energy and mineral supplies had been predicted before-- in 1908, 1944, 1952. by now many minerals should be extinct. none is. a major survival factor has been substitution between metals and between alternative forms of energy. such conservation will continue to prevent long-run shortages. besides, the earth's crust is 30 miles thick. we've barely scratched thsurf no wonder the doomsayers have been proved wrong. it seems unlikely that economic growth will stop because of too many people, too much pollution, too few resources. yet worldwide, there are vast differences between standards of living. in the next century, americans may accept lower growth rates as the rest of the world catches up. even though we've come to a slowdown, this is nothing fatal, not a collapse, as limits suggests. low growth rate is not as good as high, but it's certainly better than stagnation. the real point of these models is that man can learn to control his own future. we do have an influence on our future. we can think about what we want it to be and p
LINKTV
Dec 5, 2013 5:00am PST
. the atomic energy commission has spent over 50 years promoting the use of nuclear energy. the academics say its members should focus on tackling problems the industry has created. the experts say the commission should address a limited number of key challenges. they say those challenges should include disposal of radioactive waste and helping government leaders decide how to deal with the crippled nuclear plant in fukushima. they say the commission should also make sure nuclear technology is only used for peaceful purposes such as power generation and rsh. the experts plan to finalize their recommendations next week. >>> mexican nuclear safety officials say they located potentially dangerous radioactive material used for medical purposes. it had been removed from a stolen truck earlier in the week. the material cobalt 60 and the truck were found abandoned outside mexico city on wednesday. two armed men stole the vehicle on monday, not far from where the cargo was found. officials say the radioactive material had been removed from its protective container. authorities sealed off a 500 meter
LINKTV
Dec 4, 2013 8:00am PST
that works. light is a throbbing spark of electromagnetic energy, huh? and that throbbing spark of electromagnetic energy has a certain frequency, at a certain frequency at which it throbs, yeah. and when that, whoom, hits into a piece of glass, that glass got any atoms in there? how many say, "oh, no, the glass probably don't have any atoms"? come on, the glass got atoms. and what's the atom have around its nucleus? begin with e. - electrons. - electrons. and guess what those electrons will do when that electromagnetic energy hits it like this. hit, boom, they'll start moving the same way. they'll be set into vibration, okay? now, what's a vibrating electron do? oscillating. did we talk about that before? what's a vibrating electron do? what does it emit? oscillates. an electromagnetic wave. so that light will be captured by the atom. and them, boom, the atom will vibrate. and, foom, send out its own light wave. that catches the next atom. when that light wave hits that atom, what's that atom do? how many say, "oh, it probably don't vibrate"? come on, it vibrates, too, all righ
LINKTV
Dec 6, 2013 2:00pm PST
. well, by the time you get involved in that, everybody's sweating and pouring on the energy and slowing down. they're no longer where they were when they came into the room. it's a different place, and i think it's magic. ♪ on my way. (narrator) the power of music itself can be the force that draws people together. ♪ i would like to reach out my hand. ♪ at rock and roll concerts world-wide, musical performance often facilitates the creation of community. large concerts such as those by the pittsburgh-based band rusted root are highly interactive and transformative events that bring participants together in ways that often transcend the performance itself. ♪ send me on my way. ♪ on my way. ♪ send me on my way. (man) i think the question of what is powerful about music or musical experience is very interesting, because i think it goes beyond the scales that are being performed or the particular rhythms or even necessarily the execution of it. i think that the environment that's created between the band and the audience provides some sort of emotional venue in which many magica
LINKTV
Dec 4, 2013 2:00pm PST
, the rebirth of its intellectual energy came from a rediscovery of classical culture. without ever leaving santa croce, we can move into the world of the renaissance with this tomb of leonardo bruni, longtime chancellor of florence, who died in 1444. this was the florence of humanists, the students of the classics, of the knowledge and the wisdom of the ancient world. they went right back to the great greek philosophers. he also wrote a history of florence, starting with roman times. and in this great work, he put historical writing onto a new footing, both in terms of its literary content and its scholarly underpinning. and there he lies, his history on his breast, surrounded by wealth of classical detail, his bier supported by the roman eagles and his hope of heaven in the roundel of the virgin and child above his head. this monument in itself is a wordless combination of the christian and the classical. this is the pantheon, the most perfectly preserved temple of ancient rome. scholars like bruni and the artists of renaissance florence had a passionate love affair with antiquity. the hu
LINKTV
Dec 3, 2013 8:00am PST
either. why is that true? we're gonna talk about these ideas. we're gonna talk about the idea how energy relates to these things. it's the knowing how hot-- how much energy is gonna flow. and we get that idea. we make these distinctions. you guys know when you go on the top of the mountains, it's cold up there. but you're closer to the sun, right? in the top of the mountains, it's cold. and somebody say, "hey, how come it's so cold up here?" so--we're closer to the sun. wait, no, no, no. that should make us hotter. you guys know when you're approaching the sun, it gets hotter and hotter, don't you? have you known that? i mean, you can get in the best ceramic materials that the humans can make. you get within a million miles of that sun. honey, you're gonna fry to a crisp, a million miles from the sun, unless you go at nighttime. [laughter] hey, but the point, back again, you're up at the top of the hill and it's cool up there. and you know what you can tell your friends? hey, gang, you know why it's so cool up here? because warm air rises. let me ask you a question, does warm air rise? y
LINKTV
Dec 6, 2013 2:30pm PST
carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. they use the energy from sunlight to convert carbon dioxide into carbohydrates -- into plant. and ecosystems on land are taking up a relatively large amount of the carbon that's emitted by human actions, essentially providing a subsidy. and what we'd like to know is, we into the future, will that carbon uptake -- that subsidy -- increase? will it decrease? will it go away and turn from subsidy into an trburden on the atmosphere? but we don't have very good models that address the full sets of things that occur in real ecosystems. and the jasper ridge experiment allows us the opportunity to get at that in a very precise way that lets us use it as a model system for understanding the controls on carbon balance in other ecosystems. narrator: the primary goal of this elaborate outdoor laboratory is to see how these future conditions will affect the ability of ecosystems to store carbon dioxide. as these plants grow, they pull carbon dioxide out the atmosphere and transform it into plant structure, or biomass. the more these plants grow, the more
LINKTV
Dec 9, 2013 2:00pm PST
for work in mexico. mexico's resume as a host to employers looked ideal. it had ready supplies of energy, access to the huge consumer markets of the united states, and most important of all, a large labor force. but for years, much of mexico's labor force sat idle, the result of policies that excluded job-creating foreign investment, policies followed by the governments of both xico and the unedtates. was there a solution, one that would attract investment to mexico and induce mexican workers to look for work at home? the maquiladora was one solution. border factories in which mexican workers assembled u.s.-made components for export with reduced tariffs to the american market. what did the maquiladora offer to the two sides of the border? it's a twofold process which involves both mexico opening its border originally only on an experimental basis, and creating a free trade zone which would be an incentive for foreign companies to manufacture in mexico. from the point of view of american companies, the interest was to be able to find more hospitable conditions of production, including lo
LINKTV
Dec 5, 2013 3:00pm PST
and saying, "this is why i'm doing this. this is keeping me alive emotionally. this is providing the energy that i need to continue my life." barbara korsch: everett koop has made statements that 90% of the errors in medical diagnosis are due to poor communication. there's a famous study by a fellow researcher in the area, dr. beckman, who did one study of a hundred visits in an internist's office and found on the average that the doctor interrupted the patient after 18 seconds. the patient's story... often adds things that, if you were just getting the task and the measurements, you wouldn't get-- which are crucial even from a biologic point-of-view, if not from a psychologic-- for the patient. if they haven't had a chance to tell the story, they feel they haven't been understood. most doctors are looking for a patient who they can get in and get out in a short period of time, and give good quality care to. what doctors will respond positively to, however, is the patient who takes initiative, the patient who says, "you know, since our last visit, i've got some questions on my mind i'd like
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10